5 tips for the perfect wedding speech

Want a wedding speech that stands out from the crowd? Just keep these 5 things in mind and they're be talking about your speech all night long.

1. Keep it personal

Take some time to think about the special couple and your connection with them and theme the speech around that.

To start, think of three stories you might want to share and rough out the details. What do they have in common? Is the groom always late? Is the bride always laughing? Try to theme your speech around these things that make them unique.

2. Keep it original

No one wants to hear the same jokes they've heard dozens of times before. Stop searching Google for 'wedding jokes' or 'speech templates' and start telling your own stories instead. Or at the very least, take that 'brilliant joke' from google and tweak it to be about the bride or groom
 

3. Keep it Simple

If you're looking for a sure-fire way to bore the guests, fill up your speech with big words, complex ideas, or niche topics.  The best speeches are simple, straight forward and to the point. You are looking to entertain people, the way you might do on a night out, not at a lecture theatre. Stick to short sentences, simple words and small ideas. 

If you lose your place when you're rehearsing it means your speech is too complex. Go back, simplify and try again.

4. Keep it entertaining

Humans are story tellers, and the best stories are ones that conjure up emotion. And even the scariest or saddest stories have moments of humour in them. But that doesn't mean you should focus on telling jokes. In fact, I'd recommend you don't tell jokes at all - Jokes are hard and a failed joke can ruin a whole speech.

Real humour doesn’t come from a set-up and a punchline, but from telling stories. Peppering your speech with a few funny memories, quirky stories or simple observations can get even the worst comedian a hearty laugh.

5. Keep it Short

Even if you ignore every other tip in this article do not ignore this one.

No speech should ever be more than 10 minutes. If your speech is more than 1100 words, cross out every out every idea that is not your own, every sentence that runs for more than 3 punctuation marks and every story that doesn’t mean something to you.

It is much better to have a speech of 3 minutes that stays in the heart than a 15 minute speech that is instantly forgotten.